Tags

Boys Names Sometimes Given to Girls
Mason – 36 boys, 1 girl
Hudson – 32 boys, 1 girl
Riley – 28 boys, 3 girls
Aidan/Aiden – 23 boys, 1 girl
Luca/Luka – 20 boys, 2 girls
Beau/Bo – 17 boys, 1 girl
Harvey – 16 boys, 1 girl
Billy – 17 boys, 1 girl
Lenny – 17 boys, 1 girl
Koby – 13 boys, 1 girl
Elliot – 12 boys, 2 girls
Bailey – 11 boys, 2 girls
Spencer – 11 boys, 2 girls
Alex – 10 boys, 2 girls
Dylan – 8 boys, 2 girls
Parker – 7 boys, 2 girls
Jett – 9 boys, 1 girl
Harley – 8 boys, 1 girl
Finlay/Finley – 6 boys, 1 girl
Micah – 6 boys 1 girl
Oakley – 5 boys, 1 girl
Clancy – 4 boys, 1 girl

Girls Names Sometimes Given to Boys
Harper – 41 girls, 1 boy
Madison/Maddison – 41 girls, 1 boy
Marley – 26 girls, 2 boys
Mackenzie – 16 girls, 1 boy
Frankie – 15 girls, 1 boy
Addison – 8 girls, 1 boy
Emerson – 8 girls, 1 boy
Taylor – 7 girls, 2 boys

Unisex Names More Common for Boys
Charlie – 41 boys, 18 girls
Darcy – 13 boys, 9 girls
Jordan – 12 boys, 4 girls
Lleyton/Leighton – 5 boys, 2 girls

Unisex Names More Common for Girls
Remy/Remi – 13 girls, 5 boys
Eden – 10 girls, 3 boys
Asher – 6 girls, 2 boys
Quinn – 4 girls, 2 boys

Unisex Names Fairly Equally to Both Sexes
Brooklyn – 7 girls, 5 boys
Miller – 3 boys, 2 girls
Casey – 3 boys, 2 girls
Henley – 2 boys, 2 girls
Koa – 2 boys, 2 girls
Blair – 2 boys, 1 girl
Reggie – 2 boys, 1 girl
Cory/Corey – 2 girls, 1 boy
Kalani – 2 girls, 1 boy
Shelby – 2 girls, 1 boy
Sloan/Sloane – 2 girls, 1 boy
Vali – 2 girls, 1 boy
Aspen – 1 girl, 1 boy
Briley – 1 boy, 1 girl
Rocket – 1 girl, 1 boy
Tully – 1 girl, 1 boy

This isn’t a complete list of all unisex names. A few of them are taken, not from the data sheet, but from my original notes to reflect spelling variants.

One of the problems as to deciding whether a name is unisex or not is there is often a differently-spelled version for each sex. For example, I did not include Andie and Andy, because only girls were called Andie, and only boys Andy. Does it it make any difference if your daughter Andie Smith is in the same class as a boy named Andy Smith? I would assume it would be equally confusing (or equally straightforward) as a girl Andie and a boy Andie.

You can see why parents of boys are more likely to get upset over unisex names, as it is more common for a girl to be given a name much more popular for boys than the other way around. They may also be cross to discover that Mackenzie and Emerson are classified as girls’ names, because there are significantly more girls than boys with the names. It certainly doesn’t look like a level playing field, although in all fairness surname names are more likely to be used by both sexes, and these are generally more common for boys.

However, there are still genuinely unisex choices (although they nearly always seem to be names that are rare), and the numbers of girls called Mason and boys called Maddison are very low overall. You may also feel that spelling really does matter, and are therefore unconcerned about all the girls called Charlie (for example), as their name may very well be Charli or Charlee.

POLL RESULTS

There was a slight preference for not choosing a unisex name for a child, with 54% saying they probably wouldn’t, or definitely wouldn’t choose a unisex name – 20% actively hated the idea. 31% were fine with the idea of giving a unisex name to either a boy or a girl, with 13% loving the idea. There was very little difference when it came to giving unisex names to one gender and not the other: 8% would only give a unisex name to a girl, and 7% would only give a unisex name to boy.

The public were fairly evenly divided on whether the spelling of a name made a difference when indicating gender in unisex names. 52% though that the spelling made almost no difference, or very little difference, while 48% were sure that spelling was a major signifier of gender, and saw the masculine and feminine versions as completely separate names.

 

Advertisements